Blog #39 – The Path to Spiritual Maturity

By John Cline
A friend once said to me that he was done with bible study groups, with learning, with talking. He declared, “I’m going to do the stuff now”. My friend was onto something very important for a Christian and that is that once you have learned something you then need to put it into practice. My friend was not opposed to bible study groups, in fact, he was and is a big proponent of them. His point was that there comes a time when a person needs to apply what they have learned to life. For the sake of society, for one’s self, for the sake of witnessing, and of taking the gospel to the world Christians need to first, learn, and second, practice what they have learned.
The writer of the Letter to the Hebrews put it this way, in the fifth chapter, verses 12 – 14: “Though by this time you ought to be teachers, you need someone to teach you the elementary truths of God’s word all over again. You need milk, not solid food! Anyone who lives on milk, being still an infant, is not acquainted with the teaching about righteousness. But solid food is for the mature, who by constant use have trained themselves to distinguish good from evil.”
Dr. Charles Stanley puts it this way: “Believers are on a continual growth track that ascends higher and higher. This side of heaven none of us ever “arrive,” but we each have a responsibility to press on to maturity. Though many people think those who know a lot about the Bible are the spiritually mature ones, Hebrews 5:14 adds the element of practice to the growth equation. This word means a custom or habit. Christian growth requires the discipline of godly habits carried out daily.”
Dr. Stanley then adds, “Obedience is another essential element for advancement. When our desire to obey the Lord is stronger than our attraction to sin, we’ll know we are making progress in our spiritual life. In terms of physical development, the goal is to become more independent and self-sufficient as we age. But in the spiritual realm, the opposite is true. Those who are mature in Christ recognize their own inadequacy and rely on the Holy Spirit within them. It’s His job to transform our character and empower us to accomplish everything the Lord calls us to do. Getting older doesn’t mean maturity in God’s eyes. By digging into Scripture and developing righteous habits, we can use our years to grow stronger in the Lord instead of wasting time with passivity. No one accidentally becomes mature. Spiritual growth requires a diligent pursuit of God.”
So, if being spiritually mature is one of our goals in life – and, for the Christian, it should be at or near the top of our desires for ourselves – the way to do so is by studying Scripture, learning what the Bible teaches, deciding to be obedient to God’s will for our lives, and then living out what we are told to do. Then, spiritual maturity will be ours.
0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *